entertainment for your eyes...

 

necromancynancy:

Curiosities cabinet

From an italian cabinet of curiosity, note that small person was part of collection as well as guide to collection. 
Most interestingly draw attention up to decorations on the highest panel. simple forms made form tools and weapons. I have seen this in many of the different books I have looked in. the bit about the literal cabinet and the ceiling packed with different patterns and specimens creating these patterns.

 

necromancynancy:

Curiosities cabinet

From an italian cabinet of curiosity, note that small person was part of collection as well as guide to collection. 

Most interestingly draw attention up to decorations on the highest panel. simple forms made form tools and weapons. I have seen this in many of the different books I have looked in. the bit about the literal cabinet and the ceiling packed with different patterns and specimens creating these patterns.

extrablog2me:

Very morbid subject… but a slightly more interesting base.

extrablog2me:

Very morbid subject… but a slightly more interesting base.

extrablog2me:

From the original cabinets of curiosity in Paris.

extrablog2me:

From the original cabinets of curiosity in Paris.

atlasobscura:

Tombées du Camion: Inside A Parisian Cabinet of Curiosities

Tucked away in a forgotten passageway, between the upmarket fashion boutiques of Rue des Abbesses and the fall from grace to the seedy strip of Pigalle, you’ll stumble upon one of the most unusual and captivating spaces in Paris. The white whale of the Sacre Coeur is just a cobblestoned stroll away; the café where Audrey Tautou’s Amélie waitressed in the offbeat film is just around the corner on Rue Lepic. And it’s easy to imagine Amélie being a frequent customer of the quirky boutique Tombées du Camion. (The name of the store, meaning items fallen from the back of a truck, cheekily hints at stolen goods.)

I myself stumbled upon this spot on my first trip to Paris. It never left my memory, and when I eventually moved to the city it was the only place I left my CV. I now pass hour after happy hour working there, steeped in anachronistically organized chaos, never knowing quite how to sum up what we sell. To step inside this bizarre bazaar is to step out of sync with the rest of the modern world. So don’t be surprised if it takes a moment to recalibrate as you contemplate a hoarder’s paradise of vintage ephemera illuminated by industrial lamps and lined with old wooden boxes and crates — everything is in its right place. And it’s a lot of things, with each item in excess.

Get lost in the rest of Tombeés du Camion, on Atlas Obscura… 

(via extrablog2me)