entertainment for your eyes...

 

necromancynancy:

Curiosities cabinet

From an italian cabinet of curiosity, note that small person was part of collection as well as guide to collection. 
Most interestingly draw attention up to decorations on the highest panel. simple forms made form tools and weapons. I have seen this in many of the different books I have looked in. the bit about the literal cabinet and the ceiling packed with different patterns and specimens creating these patterns.

 

necromancynancy:

Curiosities cabinet

From an italian cabinet of curiosity, note that small person was part of collection as well as guide to collection. 

Most interestingly draw attention up to decorations on the highest panel. simple forms made form tools and weapons. I have seen this in many of the different books I have looked in. the bit about the literal cabinet and the ceiling packed with different patterns and specimens creating these patterns.

extrablog2me:

Very morbid subject… but a slightly more interesting base.

extrablog2me:

Very morbid subject… but a slightly more interesting base.

extrablog2me:

From the original cabinets of curiosity in Paris.

extrablog2me:

From the original cabinets of curiosity in Paris.

atlasobscura:

Tombées du Camion: Inside A Parisian Cabinet of Curiosities

Tucked away in a forgotten passageway, between the upmarket fashion boutiques of Rue des Abbesses and the fall from grace to the seedy strip of Pigalle, you’ll stumble upon one of the most unusual and captivating spaces in Paris. The white whale of the Sacre Coeur is just a cobblestoned stroll away; the café where Audrey Tautou’s Amélie waitressed in the offbeat film is just around the corner on Rue Lepic. And it’s easy to imagine Amélie being a frequent customer of the quirky boutique Tombées du Camion. (The name of the store, meaning items fallen from the back of a truck, cheekily hints at stolen goods.)

I myself stumbled upon this spot on my first trip to Paris. It never left my memory, and when I eventually moved to the city it was the only place I left my CV. I now pass hour after happy hour working there, steeped in anachronistically organized chaos, never knowing quite how to sum up what we sell. To step inside this bizarre bazaar is to step out of sync with the rest of the modern world. So don’t be surprised if it takes a moment to recalibrate as you contemplate a hoarder’s paradise of vintage ephemera illuminated by industrial lamps and lined with old wooden boxes and crates — everything is in its right place. And it’s a lot of things, with each item in excess.

Get lost in the rest of Tombeés du Camion, on Atlas Obscura… 

(via extrablog2me)

extrablog2me:

atlasobscura:

Artist Rosamond Purcell has long trained her camera lens on museum collections, making acts of organization an integral part of her striking photography and writing, but in a recent installation she set out to physically duplicate one of the most iconic collections.

Ole Worm, a 17th century Danish physician, linguist, and natural philosopher, created one of the first iterations of what we could come to know as the modern museum. The Museum Wormianum cabinet of curiosities in his home, visible in a frontispiece engraving published in a catalogue of the cabinet that came out in 1655 after his death, had everything from specimens of the natural world to scientific instruments to ethnogrpahic objects. It was all aimed not just at being a spectacle, but at being a source of study and understanding. Purcell said she had “looked at the engraving for years and years” and was “just fascinated with what was on the walls and on the shelves and wanted to reproduce it.” 

More on Ole Worm’s return to life, thanks in part to artistic obsession…

Rosamnd Purcell was one of the artists that I looked at in my dissertation. Interestingly this etching of the original Old worm piece has a few sets of legs on the shelves. 

extrablog2me:

artmastered:

William Morris, Honeysuckle (furnishing fabric), 1876

Many of these sharp classical curves and angles used as floral arrangements by william morris I see in my own work… 
I’ve been messing with my high fired bits on the laid out boards for hours and the scale is wonderful. enough room to reflect large sweeping actions that are so much more profound than the simple gardening tools hanging pieces I was previously looking at.

extrablog2me:

artmastered:

William Morris, Honeysuckle (furnishing fabric), 1876

Many of these sharp classical curves and angles used as floral arrangements by william morris I see in my own work… 

I’ve been messing with my high fired bits on the laid out boards for hours and the scale is wonderful. enough room to reflect large sweeping actions that are so much more profound than the simple gardening tools hanging pieces I was previously looking at.


So this process took over 3 hours. I was over cautious with most of the bits. This is quite literally all my eggs in one basket and I’ve spend a long time on each individual bit. It all fits perfectly! very happy that I finally estimated something right! 

As you might notice the shelves have patterns on themselves. I’ve used alot of the shapes to make all the bits fit snuggly.

This is going to be a very slow and careful bisque firing to 1060.

I do night firing to save on money but also so I don’t trip the electricity during the day. 

As we have ferrel cats and whatever else going through I will stay with the kiln all night. Especially till the bung goes in.

Its going to be a long night, hopefully this is what I will see when I open her up in a few days time!! fingers crossed!

(Source: extrablog2me)

a wonderful mix of the many different styles of presentation in a cabinet of curiosity. Something I would like to present in my own exhibition in the summer.

a wonderful mix of the many different styles of presentation in a cabinet of curiosity. Something I would like to present in my own exhibition in the summer.

(Source: rumpledlove, via currentlycantthinkofaname)